fbpx

iVaccine

Price match promise

If you find the same product cheaper within 7 days of vaccination we will refund the difference

We are unable to accept walk-in appointments between 14th and 19th of Feb 2024

Free Personalised Assessment​

Same Day Appointments

Safe + Secure Service​

Free Personal Assessment

Experienced Clinicians

Same Day Appointments​

Whooping
Cough
(Pertussis)

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It is spread through the air when an infected person talks, coughs, or sneezes.

The best way to prevent pertussis is to get vaccinated.

Price per dose

£90

Frequently Asked Questions

The sooner the better

If primary vaccination is completed pertussis vaccination continues to prevents severe disease and reduce symptoms in case of contracting the disease. In the UK over the age of 10 years, the vaccination is only recommended for pregnant women.

Due to large outbreaks of pertussis, several countries outside the UK advise on the use of  pertussis vaccination for adults, family, and close contacts of newborns.

Primary vaccination programme depends on the age of the patient and starts from 8 weeks of age
  1. Booster doses in the UK are routinely given to pregnant woman from 16 weeks of gestation
  2. Travellers planning to visit newborn babies can consider a booster dose
Injection site irritations, soreness and hardened skin. Potentially fever, fatigue, tiredness and flu like symptoms.

Children receive a multi dose programme starting form 8 weeks of age.

Take Action

The best way to prevent pertussis is to get vaccinated. The pertussis vaccine is given as part of combination vaccine, which is recommended for children from age of 8 weeks.

More About
Whooping Cough or
Pertussis

Pertussis can affect people of all ages, but it is most serious in infants and young children, as it can cause severe coughing spells that can lead to difficulty breathing, vomiting, and other complications.

Symptoms of pertussis usually appear within 5 to 10 days after exposure, but can take up to 21 days to appear. Early symptoms of pertussis may include a runny nose, low-grade fever, and a mild cough. As the illness progresses, the cough becomes more severe and is characterized by episodes of rapid, explosive coughing that can be followed by a high-pitched “whoop” sound when the person inhales. These coughing spells can last for several minutes and can be severe enough to cause vomiting, difficulty breathing, and a bluish tint to the skin due to lack of oxygen.
Pertussis is treated with antibiotics, which are most effective when given in the early stages of the illness. It is important to get medical treatment as soon as possible to reduce the risk of complications.

The best way to prevent pertussis is to get vaccinated. The pertussis vaccine is given as part of combination vaccine, which is recommended for children from age of  8 weeks. A booster shot, can be recommended for adolescents and adults. It is important for people who are in close contact with infants, such as parents, siblings, and healthcare workers, to get vaccinated to help protect vulnerable babies.

If you or someone you know has been exposed to pertussis, it is important to take preventive measures to reduce the risk of spreading the illness. This may include staying home from work or school, covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, and washing your hands frequently. If you think you or someone you know may have pertussis, it is important to see a healthcare provider for a diagnosis and treatment.

Sit back and relax

Book a personalised vaccination appointment with our team